Magsofy – Jah Wobble at Elsewhere

Magsofy – Jah Wobble at Elsewhere

People talk about honesty in art, about truth, about players’ transformations and how sometimes they lose their heart.  Not Jah Wobble.  No way…I’ve never seen PiL, I’ve never seen his solo projects, and I’ve never really paid that much attention to him. And then I did. I bought his book “Memoirs of a Geezer”, I listened to as much of his discography that I could handle (it’s huge and exhausting) and I saw him play with The Invaders of the Heart at Elsewhere in Bushwick, Brooklyn this past October. On stage he came off as the guy in the book – a straight shooter from the East End.  Jah mostly sits down while he plays, which I have to say – I  equally loved and equally laughed at. He’s still staying true to dub-step and playing hypnotic bass parts and I don’t think his playing has either evolved or devolved.  It is what it is. I started to dissect the show and the “performance” and relate his past to what I was seeing in the present, but that was a waste of time.  I concluded that he’s truly a geezer.  What I saw was what I got.  What I would have seen in 1978, I mostly saw in 2018.  I don’t have much more to say.  I really think this guy’s playing speaks for itself.  There is no hidden message, he’s not trying to pull-one off on the audience.  He’s just being Jah.  Playing the same art and getting better at it…or not, but he’s truly playing and creating from his heart. If you want a good read, I...

Saturday, March 9th, 2019, at 9:00pm

Playing with Slyboots Saturday, March 9th, 2019, at The Bitter End with Brick Briscoe. The Bitter End 147 Bleecker Street (between Thompson and LaGuardia) New York, NY 10012 / $10...
InterMagsView – with Sal Maida!

InterMagsView – with Sal Maida!

Heylo Bassers!  Here is another installment of my InterMagsView where I sit down and bribe really cool bass players with food and wine to talk to me about really cool stuff! My interview below is with Sal Maida.  We had a very nice chat about his new book, playing bass in the 70s and just shot the breeze over dinner this spring at Kefi on the Upper West Side – Mags: When you sat down to write Four Strings, Phony Proof, and 300 45s what was your intention? Sal: The book started with me just mulling over the idea for a while, but I was always on the road. I played in a band called Cracker for 8 years. I’d been thinking about it and thinking about it, but I never had the time. I really couldn’t start scribbling in hotel rooms because there was always something going on. When I wasn’t touring anymore I went to see Chazz Palminteri do A Bronx Tale, but not the Broadway show. He did a one-man show and I went to see it in Huntington, Long Island. I thought to myself, “Hmmm…I have some stories like that that I could weave into the music stuff.” Then I read Questlove’s book, which weaved records into the timeline of his stories. That gave me the loose idea of what I eventually did and the Chazz Palminteri show gave me the inspiration to write down all these stories about growing up. I also read Neil Young’s book that was out of sequence. I thought, “Okay, it’s going to be out of sequence, it’s going to include my...